Nerdtastic!


College Junior majoring in English and Journalism with a minor in Arabic language. This blog is mostly fandoms, silliness, and feminism. :)

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promiscuous-petal:

enough about sex positions has anyone discovered a reading position which doesn’t get uncomfortable after 5 minutes

Source: promiscuous-petal

euo:

eatallthefandoms:

euo:

It’s 2014 and people still don’t realize that you can’t be a feminist if you’re racist

Technically this is wrong

It’s 2014 and people still don’t realize that you can’t be a feminist if you’re racist

Source: euo

quadguyin-china:

salt-in-my-hair-and-heart:

liteskint:

gigaguess:

Oh.
My.
God.

B Y E

Am I allowed to tell this joke at parties??

She is so satisfied with that joke.

quadguyin-china:

salt-in-my-hair-and-heart:

liteskint:

gigaguess:

Oh.

My.

God.

B Y E

Am I allowed to tell this joke at parties??

She is so satisfied with that joke.

Source: acidocasualidad

Source: missdontcare-x

thatisludicrous:

castiels-celestiel-dick:

vinegod:

Some people say I look like this guy by MrLegenDarius

jfc

OH MY GOD YES

Tagged: vine video

Source: vinegod

Source: fuckyeahstills

katsudonburi:

swanjolras:

like tbh i feel like my problem with the “dark and gritty!!” trend in modern stories is this

there’s this idea in our culture that cynicism is realistic? that only children believe in happy endings, that people are ultimately selfish and greedy and seeing with clear eyes means seeing the world as an awful place

that idealism is— easy, i guess. butterflies and sunshine and love are easy things to have in your head.

but i’ve known since i was fifteen that idealism— faith in humanity— optimism— is the most difficult thing in the entire world.

i constantly struggle to have faith in humanity, because it’s really, really easy to lose it. it’s easy to look at the news and go “what were you expecting? of course humans behave this way.” it’s easy to see the world and go “ugh, there’s no hope there.” and the years when i believed that were easy. miserable— but easy.

it is hard work to see the good in people. it is hard work to hope. it is hard work to keep faith and love and joy and appreciation for beauty in my daily life.

and when moviemakers and tv producers and writers go “omg!!! all characters are selfish and act poorly and don’t love each other, nothing ever happens that is happy or good, that’s so much more realistic, that’s so much more adult”

no, it’s not

it’s childish.

it’s the most childish thing i can imagine.

One of the prevailing theories right now is that dystopias and “gritty” fiction are so popular because life’s going pretty rough for a lot of people these days. (Income disparity, etc etc etc.) And I can see a lot of value in fiction that emphasizes the heroes being able to triumph eventually over a Byzantine and horrible system that codifies unfairness and grinds people into dust. (Even if the price of that triumph is high.)

But I also think there’s a big difference that needs to be understood between the dark, dystopian backdrop (and right now, man, even I have some serious dystopia fatigue) and this constant attempt to make characters “edgy” and “dark” and morally ambiguous. I think the most recent, egregious example of that was in Man of Steel, when a situation is manufactured to force Superman to kill Zod. But it also makes me keep thinking back to one of the disagreements I had with Stina during the recent Skiffy and Fanty in which we discussed BBC’s Sherlock

A character having a moral center or a sense of hope or empathy with others does not perforce mean they have no complexity or that the world they occupy is black and white. Just look around us. The world can be a shitty place sometimes. And yet most people—and the ultimate goal of a good character is for them to be as complex and fully realized as a person—manage to be good, and loving, and empathetic, and have faith in others. And of course, sometimes we fail to be those things, and that is part of what makes us human. Then we get over our failures and find new ways to fail.

Frankly, I think it actually takes that complexity away from a character, to reduce them to a series of (often contrived) traumas and then never let them move past it because manpain is gritty and somehow sexy.

Living things grow.

Tagged: idealismcynicismlet the dystopian genre take a break for a bitand stop making super happy characters sad and gritty

Source: swanjolras

sexhaver:

okay since yall seem to be incapable of identifying fake sj posts here’s a handy guide:

  1. go to the source of the post
  2. check the tags
  3. if it’s tagged with two thousand variations of “otherkin” and “headspace” and “sj” then it is 100% fake no exceptions and if you reblog it unironically you are a bad person

Source: sexhaver

sheep-girl:

teenage girls actually have to go through a lot of bullshit and the fact that it’s considered cool to make fun of them for being upset or emotional is kind of gross

Source: louyouwhore

ffrenchtoast:

"Apologize to her!"

Tagged: pacific rim

Source: ffrenchtoast

makisekurisus said: the best example I've heard against losers who use "not all men": "When you go to the pool and the lifeguard tells everyone to stop running, if you weren't running in the first place, you can safely assume that they weren't talking to you anyway. It's not necessary to call attention to the fact that you weren't running."

heavymetalchemist:

misandry-mermaid:

gathererofclouds:

This is in fact an absurd example. One can assume safely that the pool-goers not protesting are not near the runners in question and that the lifeguard’s attention is focused when the whistle is blown and the command uttered.

The accusation against men who say “not me” are responding to blanket statements of “men are jerks because they do ‘x’ ” which seems to include all men in its circumference of guilt. What should be said is “men who do ‘x’ are jerks,” which narrows the circle down to a narrow spotlight on those who perform the guilty action (running by the pool in this case).

If you’re tired of dealing with “not me” statements, consider the language you’re using— it may have more to do with the reasons why there are protests than you think.

Oh look, a guy with a porn blog is here to mansplain us silly ladies about how “not all men.”  Thanks for the tone-policing, broseph.

Okay so I grew up in a tourist town and the town’s economy heavily depends upon tourism, okay?  And I’ve worked jobs in that town (because duh it’s my hometown) that required me to deal with said tourists.

Well.

Tourists don’t read signs.  Tourists maybe do read signs, but somehow think they don’t apply to them.  Like the guy who came in the exit “because the entrance was closed” THAT IS BECAUSE WE ARE NOT OPEN YET (hours clearly posted, it was 6:30 AM, omfg).  Tourists are legend for asking questions like “at what altitude do deer turn into elk?” and “where are the mountains?” and so forth (hi it’s a small mountain town).  Also, they don’t know how to drive.  They don’t follow speed limits because they’re too busy ogling the mountains or doing whatever.

I’ve had tourists walk out into the middle of the street in front of me, while I’m driving a car, without looking, to take pictures.

Fucking tourists, man.  They’re a fucking nightmare.

OH BUT WAIT IT’S NOT ALL TOURISTS.  I am just venting and telling stories about the worst and most inconsiderate ones!  I mean the good tourists, I don’t even really notice because they are fine and behave like reasonable people!  But anyone from a tourist town knows EXACTLY what I am talking about when I start to complain about tourists.

It’s the same damn thing.  If you’re not one of THOSE tourists, then you’re not who we’re complaining about.  Although let’s be real anyone who’s been a tourist has probably done something foolish because you’re unfamiliar with the territory, and wow this analogy is really apt because the same thing goes for men too!  It’s like when you’re unaware of something, say, patriarchal privilege or local customs, you are probably going to make mistakes sometimes that annoy, say, underprivileged people or locals!

When in Rome, do as the Romans do.  Learn where your privilege-unawareness is and become aware.

coconutmilk83:

Into The Woods | 2014 ()

Tagged: i'm here and i am excited for thisinto the woods

Source: coconutmilk83

spudsexuall:

It’s so fucking weird how girls can just tell when our periods start. Like the exact fucking moment. You’re just sitting in bed or standing in line for groceries and your face does that thing kind of like in That’s so Raven when Raven gets a vision

Source: spudsexuall

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.
Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.

Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

Tagged: historyafrican historywest africa

Source: the-history-of-fighting